Is Ginger Good For Osteoarthritis?

Photo by NoonBrew on Unsplash

Ginger can help with osteoarthritis by increasing circulation. Studies have shown that increased circulation will allow for increased flexibility of the joints, which is what you are looking for as an arthritis solution.

Please, click here for a detailed article about the scientifically proven health benefits of ginger.

It’s well established that ginger linens mobility and reduces feelings of pain. When you drink ginger tea before exercising, it helps to loosen stiff muscles and injuries, increases blood flow to the heart and lowers your cholesterol levels.

The spicy flavor has also been shown to decrease nausea during chemotherapy treatments, fight bacterial infections naturally (even if they resist antibiotics), slow digestion after eating heavy meals ,and reduce morning sickness among pregnant women.

Ginger can help with osteoarthritis by alleviating pain, reducing inflammation and improving joint mobility.

Ginger is a useful remedy for musculoskeletal and arthritic conditions because it has anti-inflammatory and analgesic (pain-relieving) properties. The spice also stimulates circulation of blood to muscles of the body — good for treating muscle aches that happen as a result of arthritis or just from overexertion during exercise.

Major benefits of ginger are: ginger lessens discomfort in knees, decreases swelling of ankles due to high blood pressure, eases menstrual cramps, relieves nausea and indigestion, suppresses coughs and colds, cures bronchitis.

Please, click here for information about how you can write stories, articles, books, and answers faster using Jarvis artificial intelligence.

Disclaimer:

(1) All content found in my articles, including text, images, audio, or other formats were created for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health providers with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read in my publications. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor, go to the emergency department, or call the emergency hotline in your country immediately. My publications do not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, or opinions. Reliance on any information in my publications is solely at your own risk.

(2) Some of the links on my blog are affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn a small commission if you decide to make a purchase. Please understand that I have experience with all of the companies, and I recommend them because they are extremely helpful. By using my affiliate links, you are helping me keep this blog up and running.

--

--

--

Writer of "Work Smart and Become Rich" available on https://amzn.to/3uIO6gb

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Recommended from Medium

WFH: Woke From Home

How Your Nonprofit Can Utilize Donor Surveys

Redefining In-Person Events

How to Set Up WordPress Form Tracking in Google Analytics

Why you should be doing videos on social media

6 Ways to Show Your Donors Some Love This Valentine’s Day

Capture your WordPress website visitors right inside your Zoho CRM

Restaurants and Takeaways: a Quick-Start Guide

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Takarudana Mapendembe

Takarudana Mapendembe

Writer of "Work Smart and Become Rich" available on https://amzn.to/3uIO6gb

More from Medium

Chronicle 3: Housing for a New Marriage

You are like Diane Nguyen from Bojack Horseman

Here is a letter to a rejection email that actually didn’t suck.

The Best 20 Ardal O’Hanlon Quotes